Thursday, 01 March 2018 14:32

March Superintendency Message

A message from Assistant Superintendent Kevin Sederholm:

Last year at this time, I wrote a Superintendency Message about recruiting new teachers. One year later, here we are again looking to bring new teachers to our district that will positively impact our students. We will always try and find the best candidates possible to be with our students.

Recently I was at a job fair recruiting when a young teacher approached me and said, “I want to teach in your district.” I found out that this teacher was from out of state but would be moving into our area. Out of curiosity I asked her why she wanted to teach for us. Her response was that she had researched all of the districts in our surrounding area and had talked to many people who live in the vicinity. She went on to say that although what she read about our district was impressive, it was the fact that with all the many people she had talked to about our district, no one said anything negative. This was a proud moment and I have to admit this has happened on many other occasions with myself as well as others that have helped me recruit.

I attribute this experience to the many dedicated employees and parents that we have in our district. People who go about their day knowing their most important job is to take care of children.

Weber School District has been and will always be dedicated to teaching and developing the whole child. We will continue to look for those future employees that will meet these expectations. Many thanks go out to everyone that helps with this process.

Saturday, 03 February 2018 22:35

February 2018 Superintendency Message

Some years ago, I had the privilege of listening to the renowned historian, David McCullough, speak in Salt Lake City. The title of his lecture instantly grabbed my attention—“The Importance of Teachers.” McCullough discussed the influence teachers had had on key figures in American history. I was especially impressed by one of McCullough’s stories—The Incident of the Fish:

Louis Agassiz, a well-known American scientist of his day, was also a master teacher with a rather unconventional teaching style. Agassiz was a professor at Harvard University. He prepared no syllabus for his courses, nor did he require an entrance exam for students to enroll in his classes. They were accepted simply on whether or not he liked them, which meant that he took just about everyone. 

Agassiz believed that the way to all learning, “the backbone of education,” as he frequently reminded his students, was to know something thoroughly. “A smattering of everything is worth little,” he asserted. His goal was to teach students “to see deeply” in order to develop genuine understanding. This objective was illustrated by “the incident of the fish,” as told by one of his former students, Samuel Scudder.

After Professor Agassiz interviewed and accepted Samuel Scudder into his class, he asked Samuel when he would like to begin. Scudder responded, “Right now.” Agassiz excused himself momentarily. When he re-entered the classroom, he was carrying a dead fish! This was a stinking, putrid and foul-smelling fish personally selected by Agassiz from among countless jars lining the shelves. Professor Agassiz placed the dead fish on a dish in front of Samuel Scudder. He then provided this simple instruction, “Look at the fish.”  At this point, Agassiz left the room. Scudder described what happened next:

In ten minutes I had seen all that could be seen of that fish.  Half an hour passed—an hour—another hour; the fish began to look loathsome. I turned it over and around; looked it in the face—ghastly!  I was in despair. I was forbidden to use a magnifying glass. Instruments of all kinds were forbidden. My two hands, my two eyes, and the fish! It seemed a most limited field. I pushed my finger down its throat to feel how sharp the teeth were. I began to count the scales in the different rows, until I was convinced that that was nonsense. At last a happy thought struck me—I would draw the fish, and now with surprise I began to discover new features in the creature.

Hours later, Agassiz returned and listened as Scudder attempted to describe his observations and asked his teacher what he should do next. The astute professor repeated his original directive, “Look at the fish!”  Scudder continued:

I was irritated; I was mortified. Still more of that wretched fish! But now I set myself to my task with a renewed will, and discovered one new thing after another. The afternoon passed quickly; and when, toward its close, the professor inquired, “Do you see it?” I replied, “No, I am certain I do not, but I see how little I saw before.

The following day, having thought of the fish throughout the night, Samuel Scudder had a brainstorm. “The fish,” he explained to Professor Agassiz, “had symmetrical sides with paired organs.”

“Of course! Of course!” Agassiz said, obviously delighted, when his new student shared his newfound insight. Once again, Scudder asked what he should do next, and Agassiz enthusiastically replied, “Oh, look at your fish!” This lesson went on for three full days. “Look, look, look!” was the repeated charge. Years later, Scudder, who became widely known for his work on the importance of first-hand, careful observation in the natural sciences, frequently recalled the legacy of his beloved teacher. 

In an era that places too great an emphasis on testing, it is vital that we continue to teach for deep understanding, just as Louis Agassiz did so many years ago. We should always consider the following question, “What does it mean to truly understand something?” Understanding fundamental, core ideas and developing the capacity to transfer and apply should be the primary goals of all teaching and learning. Thank you to the hundreds of dedicated teachers in Weber School District who teach for deep understanding, application and transfer every day. This remains “the backbone” of a child’s educational experience.

Wednesday, 03 January 2018 01:27

January 2018 Superintendency Message

A message from Assistant Superintendent Jane Ann Kammeyer:

Happy New Year! It is that time of year when we stop to reflect and make New Year’s resolutions. I always start the new year with big goals… go on a diet, get more exercise. But, let’s face it; it usually doesn’t happen. However, here are a few school/work New Year’s resolutions you and I might actually be able to fulfill in 2018.

Positive Thinking

Coming off a much-needed break, make sure your classroom is a happy place for you and your students in the long stretch to summer.

Revisit Goals

I’m referring to your own personal classroom goals. We are at the mid-year point for school and it is a great time to do a check for where you are now and where you want your students to be in a few short months.

Give Individual Time and Attention to Students

The caring professional relationships we develop with our students is important to the learning process. Continue to know and seek to understand each student in your classroom.

Spice Up Your Teaching Routine

Be adventuresome in trying something new. Use technology or add a new evidence based instructional strategy each month to keep things new and challenging for you and your students. Making a list and assigning one new thing to each month will help you actually stick to this resolution.

Get Organized – Work Smarter, Not Harder

I really need this one… With the fresh start following the break, now is a great time to get your classroom organization back on track. Being organized helps you feel so much better.

Get Your Work/Life Balance in Order

This is last on my list, but it is certainly not the least important. As best you can, keep school work at school and enjoy your time at home. Keeping yourself happy will be better for you and your students.

So, what resolutions will you work on this year? Whatever it is, I hope that you have a wonderful 2018.

Thursday, 01 December 2016 08:36

December 2016 Superintendency Message

December is an exciting month with all of the holiday activities, the music, and the gatherings with family and friends sharing traditions and the spirit of the season. It is about the relationships we have with those we care about. I feel very fortunate, that on a daily basis I get to work with people that I call my friends. I have the opportunity of collaborating with talented teachers, administrators and support staff who are driven by a desire to help all students. Just as important as our education family are the amazing students we work with every day. I see the strong bonds developed between a caring educator and their students and how it makes all the difference in the world when it comes to teaching and learning.

During our October Professional Learning Day, conversations were centered around Relationships, Rigor and Relevance. You can see that the word relationship is first. As educators we must establish stable, warm, and trusting environments for students. One of our amazing educators, tells of a story when he was a science teacher. He was working with a small group of students and they had been asking him several questions. One of them said he had one more question and then asked, "How do you make every student feel like they are your favorite?" If we want to ensure students learn, communicate and think at high levels, we have to develop positive, trusting relationships with students, all students.

In a TED Talk, Rita Pierson challenges teachers to understand the power of relationships. She believes deeply in forming strong bonds with her students: through simple things like apologizing, laughing and just acknowledging their successes. Rita states, "Strong relationships encourage learner exploration, dialogue, confidence, and mutual respect."

In Weber School District, we have great people doing great things that impact the lives of our children every day. Continue to value caring, professional relationships between students and teachers. Enjoy the month of December and the energy the students bring to the classroom ... even though you are exhausted from all the holiday activities. May you treasure this season and all of its wonder as you surround yourself with family and friends. Happy Holidays!


Jane Ann Kammeyer
Assistant Superintendent