Displaying items by tag: COVID19

Thursday, 22 October 2020 12:20

Low Risk Test And Return

Low Risk Test and Return

A student, teacher, or staff member who was exposed at school to someone who tested positive for COVID-19 may return to work at a school or in-person learning if he or she meets ALL of the following:  

  1. The school verifies the student, teacher or staff member who was exposed and the person who tested positive were both wearing a face mask as defined by the State Public Health Order on masks in schools. 
  2. The quarantined student, teacher, or staff member has a negative COVID-19 test result (must be a PCR or antigen test, not an antibody test). The test result must be from at least 7 days after the last exposure to the person who tested positive. 
  3. The student, teacher, or staff member does not have symptoms of COVID-19.

The Low Risk Test and Return protocol does not apply to students, teachers, staff, or settings that are exempt from the State Public Health Order on masks in schools. 

If the student, teacher, or staff member who was exposed meets ALL three criteria he or she may return to work, school or related activities, if the employee or the parents of the student choose. If the person does not meet ALL three criteria or chooses not to get tested, he or she should quarantine at home for 14 days from the last day of exposure. 

Anyone who has been exposed to COVID-19 and comes back to school must continue to watch for symptoms. If employees or students get symptoms, they should isolate at home and call their healthcare provider.

These guidelines only apply to exposures that occur at school. 

Published in Covid-19
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Thursday, 22 October 2020 12:16

New Quarantine Guidelines

On 10/8/2020, State Superintendent Dickson announced the following recommended adjustments to the state's quarantine guidelines. This new guidance is exclusive to exposures occurring at school. 

According to the new guidelines, "A student, teacher or staff member who was exposed at school to someone who tested positive for COVID-19 may return to work at school or in-person learning if he or she meets ALL of the following:

  1. The school verifies the student, teacher or staff member who was exposed and the person who tested positive were both wearing a face mask as defined by the State Public Health Order on masks in schools.
  2. The quarantined students, teacher or staff member has a negative COVID-19 test result (must be a PCR or antigen test, not an antibody test). The test result must be from at least 7 days after the last exposure to the person who tested positive.
  3. The student, teacher, or staff member does not have symptoms of COVID-19."

It's important to note, this only applies to exposures that occur at school. Community, social, household and other types of exposures are still subject to the 14-day quarantine requirement.

Weber School District will begin following the state's new guidelines beginning Monday, November 2, 2020 (The start of 2nd term). The guidance does not apply to staff and students who are currently in quarantine.

It will be the responsibility of a student's parents to complete certain steps before a student will be considered eligible to return to school under these new guidelines. This includes completing all necessary paperwork, having their child tested, and submitting required documentation to the school's Point of Contact (POC). Testing will need to be done at an approved testing site since the district does not administer COVID-19 tests. 

As a reminder, if it can't be verified that the student, teacher or staff member who was exposed and the person who tested positive were both wearing a face mask during the exposure, the quarantine period will not be adjusted and will remain at 14 days.  

Although there may be times when masks aren't required under the public health order like during lunch, recess, PE, sporting events or other extracurricular activities, any student who is identified as potentially exposed in these situations where masks aren't being worn, will not be eligible to return early from the 14-day quarantine period. 

The district is in the process of hiring additional Point of Contacts (POCs), to assist our school nurses with the contact tracing process. Many of these new POCs should be place by November 2nd. This is part of the reason for the delay in implementing the proposed changes.

If a student, teacher or staff member is identified as potentially being exposed to someone with COVID-19 in the school environment, they will be contacted by a representative from the school who will inform them of the quarantine requirements, including the criteria outlined above.

Published in Covid-19
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Thursday, 22 October 2020 12:14

State Superintendent Letter

Colleagues,

At the request of many of our School Superintendents and Charter Directors, a school medical advisory group met and recommended adjustments to the 14 day quarantine.  The Utah Dept. of Health, under the direction of Governor Herbert, has approved the attached Low Risk Test and Return guidance.  The medical experts on the advisory group indicate that this aligns with the best medical practice of adjusting the intensity of intervention based on risk and consequences of overprescribing an intervention.  Key points aligned with this practice are:

  • Masks are effective at preventing transmission in classroom settings
  • This only applies to mask on mask exposure
  • Only applies to exposures that occurred in school
  • % of individuals who will develop symptoms do so on: 
    • Day 7 -75%, 
    • Day 9 - 90% 
    • Day 11- 95%
    • Testing picks up positive cases two days before symptoms onset; therefore, testing on day 7 means there is less than a 10% chance that an individual will contract after day 7
  • This is for individual exposures, and does not pertain to the threshold recommendations for classroom or school virtual learning

Your local health officers were instrumental in crafting and supporting this update and are ready and willing to assist. The Rapid tests (Abbot BinaxNOW) are still being distributed and your LHO will likely be the best source to know when and where the tests can be accessed.  The COVID-19 School Manual will be updated to reflect this change but the change takes effect immediately. 

We hope this updated guidance will both be an incentive for improved classroom mask wearing behaviors and expedite students getting back into school safely.

With appreciation for your leadership during this challenging time,

Sydnee Dickson, Ed.D.
State Superintendent of Public Instruction
250 E. 500 S.
PO Box 144200
Salt Lake City, UT 84114-4200
(801) 538-7510 W

Published in Covid-19
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Friday, 11 September 2020 15:30

WSD Covid-19 Case Count

Active cases as of: 

Wednesday 10/14/2020 Active Positive Cases Currently in Quarantine Cleared from Quarantine Recovered Positive Cases
Students 52 809 1294 69
Employees (District-wide) 18 91 102 33
Total Cases 70 900 1396 102
         
Breakdown (Students)        
Elementary 8 124 337 32
Secondary 44 685 957 37
Total Student Cases 52 809 1294 69
 
 
Published in Covid-19
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Friday, 10 July 2020 13:13

Face masks

Yes, a reusable cloth face mask with school colors and logo will be provided to every student and staff member at each of our schools.

Published in Covid-19
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Friday, 10 July 2020 08:42

Return to School

July 10, 2020

Dear Parents, Students, Teachers and Staff Members,

Members of the Weber Board of Education and I recognize that there are questions and concerns regarding the opening of school this fall. District and school leaders are spending the summer preparing for the return of students in August. Throughout the entire school year, Weber School District will follow guidance from state and local health department officials regarding school opening or possible closures. This year's return to school will come with some new protocols and procedures in order to keep everyone safe and healthy. Here is a link to our Safe Weber—A Responsive Framework to COVID-19. We encourage everyone to get familiar with the document, along with its accompanying protocols. While it will alter certain aspects of the school day, our goal is to maintain a normalized environment where students can learn and teachers can teach.  

Each of us continues to hope for a vaccine and effective therapeutics to treat the spread of the coronavirus. Optimistic medical advances are certainly bringing that day closer. Until then, our individual behavior will become the most effective defense against the virus. Up to this point, our best countermeasures against the virus have been limiting large scale social interactions and imposing restrictions on group gatherings (e.g., soft closure of schools, closures of non-essential businesses, stay-at-home recommendations, etc.). We have moved into a period where these types of restrictions are less sustainable. We are now beginning to rely more on individual behaviors. Frankly, our goal is to keep schools open, sporting events available, extracurricular activities accessible, as well as field trips, dances and graduation. The best way to accomplish that is for each of us to demonstrate individual responsibility by protecting ourselves and others.

As we open schools for in-person instruction, it is important that everyone recognizes the role they play in protecting themselves and others. It is absolutely imperative that if anyone experiences flu-like symptoms (e.g., fever, cough, chills, nausea, etc.) they stay home. The board of education has suspended high school attendance credit requirements for the 2020-21 school year so that no student feels compelled to attend school. Likewise, elementary and junior high administrators have discontinued any type of perfect attendance awards. Each school will place a heightened emphasis on facility sanitation, including the regular cleaning of touch points, horizontal surface areas and the use of electrostatic sprayers to maintain a clean and healthy school environment. Hand hygiene is vital! We will have hand sanitation stations placed throughout our schools and students will be encouraged to regularly wash their hands as a way to remove germs, avoid getting sick and prevent the spread of germs to others.  

The school district will provide face coverings for students and teachers. These face coverings are durable, washable and reusable. They will come in school colors and include the school logo. We also have a face shield for every teacher and staff member. Face shields permit the students to see and hear their teacher. These simple things like consistent hand-washing, staying home when sick, facial coverings, standing at a distance and limiting close interactions will become our best defense against the virus and keep everyone safe. Now that we know much more about how the virus is spread, we must govern ourselves in ways that will limit the spread.  

Finally, we know that there will be some families who choose to have their students learn from home. We want to accommodate that choice. We have had teams of teachers working all summer to build courses on a learning management system called CANVAS (and in some instances Google Classroom). This will enable your student to stay connected to his/her teacher and classmates while learning from home in a flexible model.  

The overall success of this school year will require each of us working closely together, listening to one another's concerns and doing our part to contribute to a positive, healthy and safe school experience.  

Professionally,  

Dr. Jeff M. Stephens

Superintendent; Weber School District

 

Safe Weber- A Responsive Framework to COVID-19 >>

Published in Covid-19
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We are excited to have our schools open and we welcome our students, teachers and staff back! Weber School District takes the health and wellness of all students and staff seriously. We have developed a strategic, deliberate plan for reopening our schools. Our goal is to open school under the Moderate Precautions listed in our Safe Weber Framework.

SAFE WEBER

A Responsive Framework to COVID-19

 

Moderate Precautions

Enhanced Precautions

Intense Precautions

Facility Sanitation

Moderate

Enhanced

Intense

Personal Protection & Hygiene

Moderate

Enhanced

Intense

Distancing & Social Gatherings

Moderate

Enhanced

Intense

Recognizing & Completing Unfinished Learning

Moderate

Enhanced

Intense

Digital Design & Delivery

Moderate

Enhanced

Intense

 *Weber School District will always follow the guidance of the Health Department and will make the necessary adaptations to ensure the health and safety of our students and staff.

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Note: Unfinished learning refers to any prerequisite knowledge or skills that students need for future work that they don’t yet have.

Core Instruction

Recognizing and Completing Unfinished Learning

Understand:

  • Study the Essential Learning Targets for upcoming instruction.
  • Identify critical, prerequisite skills and understandings students need to access grade-level content

Diagnose:

  • Determine student understanding of prerequisites based on diagnostic or formative data
  • Consider if gaps exist for the entire class or a small group.

Take Action:

  • Entire class: plan to build needed scaffolds into upcoming lessons; make necessary adjustments to pacing to allow for additional lessons
  • Small group: plan differentiated instruction or coordinate to address gaps within intervention periods

It is more important to help students catch up on thinking skills than facts.

Feedback to Students

  • Continuous, personalized, learning-centered feedback throughout the learning cycle that moves the learning forward
  • Based on submitted assignments, assessments, discussions, etc.
  • Assignments are likely fewer in number than with face-to-face instruction and feedback must increase
  • Tools: written, auditory, recorded, Google Meets, shared docs, using the “chat” feature as an exit ticket

Instructional and/or Practice Time

  • Elementary: 2 hours per day (instruction plus assignments total); 20 minutes of home reading is still highly recommended
  • Junior High: 30 min/class/day (instruction plus assignments total)
  • High School: 45 min/class/day (instruction plus assignments total)
  • For students receiving special education services, service minutes will be determined by the student’s IEP team.

Digital Content

Essential Learning Targets are on an LMS (instruction, assignments, assessments)

  • Teachers have Essential Learning Targets on a common LMS per school following the district-created style guide (instruction, assignments, assessments)
  • Ensure there are increased options for supporting students and parents who choose to participate in home-based learning.
    • Teachers may choose to use instructional tools such as: Google Meet, the conference option in Canvas, or streamed and/or recorded instructional videos.
    • Consistent time should be scheduled during which students and parents can ask for help via direct communication and support.

Assessment

  • Assessment FOR instructional feedback and design; frequent, actionable and tied to specific curriculum
  • Diagnostic assessments provided within the first two weeks of school to identify unfinished learning
  • Formative and classroom assessments (with timely results) follow frequently to provide data that will inform instruction and intervention practices
  • Use items and tasks that support deeper thinking
  • Tools: Canvas, state platforms, observations, performances, Edulastic, Forms, paper-and-pencil, Reading Inventory, DRP, CBMs, ALEKS, Preschool DOT

Student and Family Communication

  • Occurs several times per week (encourage documentation)
  • Tools: Email, phone, MyStudent, LMS, surveys and Google Forms

Grading

Based on clear demonstration of proficiency by students with multiple data points

  • Modified grading scales may be in effect as students complete online learning
  • Consider using online engagement as part of grade determinations as appropriate
  • Elementary may not issue report cards

Collaboration

  • Student-student
    • Google Meets and/or discussion threads
  • Teacher-teacher
    • Consider cross or integrated curriculum to make it possible to deliver additional content that may be necessary to address unfinished learning
    • Use team approaches and shared resources
    • Continue PLCs (using modified format)

Suggested Reading:

Note: Unfinished learning refers to any prerequisite knowledge or skills that students need for future work that they don’t yet have.

Core Instruction

  • Focus on Essential Standards from grade-level Core and scaffold as needed
  • Include Important and Supporting Standards from grade-level Core when possible
  • Include tiered extensions and remediation

Recognizing and Completing Unfinished Learning

Understand:

  • Study the Essential Learning Targets for upcoming instruction.
  • Identify critical, prerequisite skills and understandings students need to access grade-level content

Diagnose:

  • Determine student understanding of prerequisites based on diagnostic or formative data
  • Consider if gaps exist for the entire class or a small group.

Take Action:

  • Entire class: plan to build needed scaffolds into upcoming lessons; make necessary adjustments to pacing to allow for additional lessons
  • Small group: plan differentiated instruction or coordinate to address gaps within intervention periods

It is more important to help students catch up on thinking skills than facts.

Feedback to Students

  • Continuous, personalized, learning-centered feedback throughout the learning cycle that moves the learning forward
  • Based on observed and/or submitted assignments, assessments, class discussions, performances, etc.
  • Tools: written, auditory, recorded, in person, Google Meets

Instructional and/or Practice Time

  • Elementary: ELA (2 hours), Math (100 minutes), Science (30 minutes); 20 minutes of home reading is still highly recommended
  • Junior High: class period plus 15-30 min/class/day
  • High School: class period plus 40-60 min/class/day
  • For students receiving special education services, service minutes will be determined by the student’s IEP team.

Digital Content

  • Teachers have Essential Learning Targets on a common LMS per school following the district-created style guide (instruction, assignments, assessments)
  • Ensure there are increased options for supporting students and parents who choose to participate in home-based learning.
    • Teachers may choose to use instructional tools such as: Google Meet, the conference option in Canvas, or streamed and/or recorded instructional videos.
    • Consistent time should be scheduled during which students and parents can ask for help via direct communication and support.

Assessment

  • Assessment FOR instructional feedback and design; frequent, actionable and tied to specific curriculum
  • Diagnostic assessments provided within the first two weeks of school to identify unfinished learning
  • Formative and classroom assessments (with timely results) follow frequently to provide data that will inform instruction and intervention practices
  • Use items and tasks that support deeper thinking
  • Tools: Canvas, state platforms, observations, performances, Edulastic, Forms, paper-and-pencil, Reading Inventory, DRP, CBMs, ALEKS, Preschool DOT

Student and Family Communication

  • Occurs at least weekly
  • Tools: Email, phone, MyStudent, LMS

Grading

Based on clear demonstration of proficiency by students with multiple data points

  • Modified grading scales may be in effect as students complete online learning
  • Consider using online engagement as part of grade determinations as appropriate

Collaboration

  • Student-student
    • Class discussion, silent discussion, turn-and-talk (perhaps with white boards), online discussions, etc.
  • Teacher-teacher
    • Consider cross or integrated curriculum to make it possible to deliver additional content that may be necessary to address unfinished learning
    • Use team approaches and shared resources
    • Continue PLCs (may need modified format)

Suggested Reading:

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