Equity, Justice and Inclusion

Equity, Justice and Inclusion (29)

Monday, 16 December 2019 14:00

Civil Rights

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Weber School District is committed to ensuring a safe learning and working environment for all our students and employees. Weber School District prohibits discrimination, harassment (including sexual harassment), or retaliation on the basis of race, color, sex, pregnancy, religion, national origin, marital status, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or any other legally protected classification in all educational  programs, activities, admissions, access, treatment, or employment practices. Board Policy 4120 and 7100 prohibits discrimination based on race, color and national origin, sex, handicap or disability, in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972,  and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973,the Americans with Disabilities Act, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Age Discrimination in Employment Act, Equal Access Act, and Utah Code 34A-5-106.

The Equity, Justice, and Inclusion Department is committed to look for evidence and research-based practices that will enhance educational practices. The Equity, Justice, and Inclusion Department supports Weber School District Educators' work and create a space for tools and resources, but also reflect on the essence of the “why” of our work. For more information regarding civil rights, please check the following links. 

Bullying Investigation

Sexual Harrassment Complain Form

How to File and OCR Complaint

Section 504

Title IV of the Civil Rights Act

Title IX of the Education Amendment

Monday, 30 September 2019 09:54

How to file an OCR Complaint

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Discrimination on the basis of race, color, and national origin is prohibited by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.  This includes discrimination based on a person’s limited English proficiency or English learner status; and actual or perceived shared ancestry or ethnic characteristics, including membership in a religion that may be perceived to exhibit such characteristics (such as Hindu, Jewish, Muslim, and Sikh individuals).

Discrimination on the basis of sex is prohibited by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.  This includes discrimination based on pregnancy, parental status, and sex stereotypes (such as treating persons differently because they do not conform to sex-role expectations or because they are attracted to or are in relationships with persons of the same sex).

Discrimination against persons with disabilities is prohibited by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (Title II prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability by public entities, whether or not they receive federal financial assistance).  This includes discrimination against individuals currently without an impairment that substantially limits of a major life activity, but who have a record of or are regarded as having a disability.

Discrimination on the basis of age is prohibited by Age Discrimination Act of 1975.

These civil rights laws extend to all state education agencies, elementary and secondary school systems, colleges and universities, vocational schools, proprietary schools, state vocational rehabilitation agencies, libraries and museums that receive federal financial assistance from ED. These include all public schools and most public and private colleges and universities.

Weber School District is committed to ensuring a safe learning and working environment for all our students and employees. Weber School District prohibits discrimination, harassment (including sexual harassment), or retaliation on the basis of race, color, sex, pregnancy, religion, national origin, marital status, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or any other legally protected classification in all educational  programs, activities, admissions, access, treatment, or employment practices. Board Policy 4120 and 7100 prohibits discrimination based on race, color and national origin, sex, handicap or disability, in accordance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972,  and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973,the Americans with Disabilities Act, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Age Discrimination in Employment Act, Equal Access Act, and Utah Code 34A-5-106. Related inquiries and complaints may be directed to a school administrator or to the weber School District Director of Equity, Justice, and Inclusion (801) 476-7869. You may also contact the Office for Civil Rights, Denver, CO, (303) 844-5695 or, if you believe you have been discriminated in your employment, the Utah Antidiscrimination and Labor Division (UALD) at (801) 530-6801 or the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) at 1-800-669-4000..

SPANISH VERSION: Cómo presentar una queja o reclamo ante la Oficina de Derechos Civiles (OCR)

Title IX

If you believe your student has been discriminated against on the basis of sex, including gender identity and sexual orientation, in its educational programs and activities, or harassed in a manner that is creating a hostile environment for your student, you are directed to Policy 4120, paragraphs 1.5A through 1.5G which outlines procedures for filing a Title IX complaint. 

The Title IX Coordinator for Weber School District is Assistant Superindent, Art Hansen.  His contact information is: ; 801-476-7866

Section 504

If you believe your student has been discriminated against on the basis of a disability, you are directed to Policy 4120, paragraphs 2.7A through 2.7G, which outlines the procedures for filing a Section 504 complaint. The Section 504 Coordinator for Weber School District is Karen Miller, in Equity, Justice & Inclusion Department.  Ms. Miller can be reached at  .

 

Tuesday, 24 September 2019 13:47

Title IX of the Education Amendment

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The Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 states: No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance. Schools may not retaliate against any person for opposing an unlawful educational practice or policy, or made charges, testified or participated in any complaint action under Title IX. All districts and charter schools must have a designated Title IX coordinator with their contact information prominently posted in visible areas of the schools, including handbooks, and on the school's website to ensure protections to students who are being discriminated based on their sex.

If you believe your student has been discriminated against on the basis of sex, including gender identity and sexual orientation, in its educational programs and activities, or harassed in a manner that is creating a hostile environment for your student, you are directed to Policy 4120, paragraphs 1.5A through 1.5G which outlines procedures for filing a Title IX complaint. 

The Title IX Coordinator for Weber School District is Assistant Superintendent, Art Hansen. His contact information is:  ; 801-476-7866

 

Resources

Title IX Resource Guide

Sexual Harrassment Complain Form

Tuesday, 24 September 2019 13:47

Bullying Investigation

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We take reports of bullying and/or harassment very seriously. In an effort to be as responsive as possible we have created a centralized reporting form.  This system ensures a consistent, immediate response and allows for collection of data to further inform our decision making.

While an immediate response is important, our focus is on preventing these incidents and their impact on our students. We are here to offer answers, support and guidance in dealing with concerns of bullying and harassment in our schools.

 

Reporting Bullying, Discrimination and Harassment:

Complaint Form
Response Form
Witness Statement Form
Investigation Report Form

 

Board Policy regarding bullying:

WSD 5201 Bullying Policy [ENGLISH]
WSD 5201 Bullying Policy / Politica de Intimación Acoso Escolar [SPANISH]

Tuesday, 24 September 2019 13:47

Title VI of the Civil Rights Act

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Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 states: No person in the Unites States shall, on the ground of race, color, or national origin, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance. Protections include providing equity in educational opportunities for minority students as well as for students who have limited proficiency in English.

If you believe your student has been discriminated against on the basis of sex, including gender identity and sexual orientation, in its educational programs and activities, or harassed in a manner that is creating a hostile environment for your student, you are directed to Policy 4120, paragraphs 1.5A through 1.5G which outlines procedures for filing a Title VI complaint

 

Monday, 29 July 2019 15:59

School Climate and Culture

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School Climate and Equity

Equity is intrinsic to all aspects of school climate work. It is not a separate issue. The National School Climate Center defines this to be the quality and character of school life that fosters children’s, youth’s, and families’ full access to:

  1. Appropriately supported, high expectations for learning and achievement
  2. Emotionally and physically safe, healthy learning environments
  3. Caring relationships with peers and adults
  4. Participation that meaningfully enhances academic, social-emotional, civic, and moral development.

An equitable school climate responds to the wide range of cultural norms, goals, values, interpersonal relationships, leadership practices, and organizational structures within the broader community.

Schools can create more equitable communities through the following promising strategies:

  1. Encourage reflective practice and build cultural awareness in students and adults
  2. Increase understanding of diverse cultures
  3. Keep diverse schools physically and emotionally safe
  4. Make high expectations culturally responsive
  5. Design multiple pathways to meaningful participation
  6. Demonstrate caring by knowing students’ unique emotional needs

 

Weber School District Equity, Justice, and Inclusion Framework Standards -PDF document

                        edited 2020 EJIC Standards poster graphic

Monday, 29 July 2019 15:59

Professional Development

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Professional development is the strategy schools and school districts use to ensure that educators continue to strengthen their practice throughout their career. The most effective professional development engages teams of teachers to focus on the needs of their students. They learn and problem solve together in order to ensure all students achieve success. The Equity, Justice, and Inclusion Department can help leaders with a multitude of training on various topics. 

 

Teacher Resources: 

[click image to expand]

  • Hispanic Heritage Month

 AO_Hispanic_Heritage_Month_Activities_Answer_Key.JPG 

 

 Hispanic_Scientists.JPG

Monday, 29 July 2019 15:59

Interpretation and Translation Services

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Coming Soon
Monday, 29 July 2019 15:59

Family and Community Resources

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Weber School District’s Family Resource Center

Located at Burch Creek Elementary

(The center is located through the front doors to the left)

4300 S. Madison Ave. South Ogden, UT 84403     

801.476.5311    Public Welcome!

 

 

The Family Resource Center follows Weber School District’s calendar. Center hours are 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday – Thursday, when school is in session. The Center is closed during the summer.

 


 

 

Centro de Recursos Familiares del Distrito Escolar de Weber

Situado en la Primaria Burch Creek

(El centro se encuentra a la izquierda, pasando las puertas principales)

4300 S. Madison Avenue, South Ogden, UT 84403

801.476.5311 El public es Bienvenido

 

El Centro de Recursos Familiares sigue Calendario del Distrito Escolar Weber. El horario del centro es de 7:30 a.m. a 5:00 p.m. Lunes a jueves, cuando la escuela está en sesión El Centro está cerrado durante el verano. 

 

Monday, 29 July 2019 15:58

Equity, Social Justice and Inclusion Library

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 Book of the Month Review

August/September

Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Brain
by Zaretta Hammond   Published in 2014

To close the achievement gap, diverse classrooms need a proven framework for optimizing student engagement. Culturally responsive instruction has shown promise, but many teachers have struggled with its implemention - until now. 

In this book, Zaretta Hammond draws on cultting-edge neuroscience research to offer an innovative approach for designing and implementing brain-compatible culturally responsive instruction. The book includes:

  • Information on how one's culture programs the brain to process data and affects learning relationships.
  • Ten "key moves" to build students' learners operating systems and prepare them to become independent learners
  • Prompts for action and value self-reflection

 

October/November

Blind Spot
by Banaji and Greenwald   Published 2013

"I know my own mind.
I am able to assess others in a fair and accurate way."

These self-perceptions are challenged by leading psychologists Mahzarin R. Banaji and Anthony G. Greenwald as they explore the hidden biases we all carry from a lifetime of exposure to cultural attitudes about age, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, social class, sexuality, disability status, and nationality.

“Blindspot” is the authors’ metaphor for the portion of the mind that houses hidden biases. Writing with simplicity and verve, Banaji and Greenwald question the extent to which our perceptions of social groups―without our awareness or conscious control―shape our likes and dislikes and our judgments about people’s character, abilities, and potential.

In Blindspot, the authors reveal hidden biases based on their experience with the Implicit Association Test, a method that has revolutionized the way scientists learn about the human mind and that gives us a glimpse into what lies within the metaphoric blindspot.

 

December/January

Excellence Through Equity - Five Principles of Courageous Leadership to Guide Achievement for Every Student
by Alan M. Blankstein and Pedro Noguera with Lorena Kelly   Published 2016

Excellence Through Equity is an inspiring look at how real-world educators are creating schools where all students are able to thrive. In these schools, educators understand that equity is not about treating all children the same. They are deeply committed to ensuring that each student receives what he or she individually needs to develop their full potential—and succeed.

To help educators with what can at times be a difficult and challenging journey, Blankstein and Noguera frame the book with five guiding principles of Courageous Leadership:

  • Getting to your core
  • Making organizational meaning
  • Ensuring constancy and consistency of purpose
  • Facing the facts and your fears
  • Building sustainable relationships

They further emphasize that the practices are grounded in three important areas of research that are too often disregarded: (1) child development, (2) neuroscience, and (3) environmental influences on child development and learning.

 

February/March

We Can't Teach What We Don't Know
by Gary Howard  Published 2016

Gary Howard outlines what good teachers know, what they do, and how they embrace culturally responsive teaching. Change Begins With Us: School transformation begins with the teachers' willingness to change their classroom structures, school structures, and themselves. It is crucial that teachers make the commitment to look deep inside themselves to see how they can better their attitudes, practices, and beliefs related to race and cultural differences. This book is a reminder to teaching is more than a job; it is a vocation in which we must dedicate our entire self.

 

April/May

June/July/August 

 

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