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Riverdale Elementary held its Fall Literacy kickoff. Students attended presentations with noted Utah author Lance Conrad! Mr. Conrad spoke to parents at the Literacy Night about the importance of literacy and said it is okay to let children struggle. He also reminded them the importance of making reading enjoyable especially if they are struggling and to let them see you reading, read to them and have the children read to parents. Lance Conrad won Best of State in 2017 and just finished his fifth novel, Prince of Survival.
 
After Mr. Conrad spoke to parents, parents were able to learn about dyslexia from Donna Pond. Ms. Pond gave suggestions to help struggling students including how to help with phonemic awareness, connecting sounds to letters, and struggling to write.
 
The students were with their teachers during the parent presentations, engrossed in literature adventures! 
 
Riverdale Elementary held its Fall Literacy Kickoff
Student work at station at Riverdale Elementary Fall Literacy Kickoff

(1) It is a discriminatory or prohibited employment practice to take an action described in Subsections (1)(a) through (g).

(a) (i) An employer may not refuse to hire, promote, discharge, demote, or terminate a person, or to retaliate against, harass, or discriminate in matters of compensation or in terms, privileges, and conditions of employment against a person otherwise qualified, because of:

(A) race;
(B) color;
(C) sex;
(D) pregnancy, childbirth, or pregnancy-related conditions;
(E) age, if the individual is 40 years of age or older;
(F) religion;
(G) national origin;
(H) disability;
(I) sexual orientation; or
(J) gender identity.

Thursday, 01 November 2018 09:51

November 2018 Superintendency Message

A message from Superintendent Jeff Stephens:

This fall marks a rather momentous time in our district's history. Four of our schools (Wahlquist, Orion, North Ogden Elementary and Lakeview Elementary) now have the technology to provide personalized instruction and learning for every student! Some school districts refer to this as a "one-to-one" computer initiative in schools. Each student in these four schools was issued a chromebook computer of their own. Just a few short years ago, a personalized instruction and learning model through technology in our district seemed out of reach. In fact, we were encouraging students to bring their own device in order to increase access to technology. However, due to investments from the legislature, as well as increased funding from School Trust Lands and community councils willing to dedicate some of that funding toward technology, achieving our goal of utilizing technology to personalize instruction and learning in our schools has become attainable.

The excitement is not that every student has their own computer. Rather, it is the enriched teaching and learning that occurs with this infusion of technology. For example, at Orion Junior High, language arts teacher Ashley Marks described a virtual field trip that her students experienced touring a plantation home and the Creole lifestyle around New Orleans prior to reading Lois Duncan's Locked in Time. "It has completely transformed my classroom from a two-dimensional to a three-dimensional learning space," Ashley explained. LeAnn Jensen's 8th grade U.S. History class was in the hall where she had set up QR codes for her students to scan. Each QR code would link to a website, document or brief video on a Revolutionary War topic. Students worked in teams and were highly engaged as they learned of the Battle at Breed's Hill, the siege of Boston, and significant events at Lexington and Concord. LeAnn said, "I love that my classes are so interactive now."

At North Ogden Elementary, 5th grade teacher Jake Burnett explained his initial concern was the potential for decreased interaction with students due to increased computer time. He has witnessed just the opposite. Using Nearpod, Jake and his students explored Delicate Arch, observing first-hand the erosion of these monuments. In my visit to Jake's class, students were working in teams using the online review tool Quizlit. Students were highly engaged in what otherwise could have been a routine activity. Amy Filiaga's 4th grade class was augmenting language arts with ReadWorks. Amy had seen some bullying behavior and was counteracting with an on-line auxiliary text called, "Cool to Be Kind."

Wahlquist Ed Tech Coach Matt Winters described outstanding applications of technology by teachers including a virtual archeology dig in Jackie Acosta's history class, as well as the design of slope ramps in Brent Bourgeous' math class using Spheros. I loved hearing Melissa Judkins tell me about how students in her FACS class used Google Sites to create podcasts, video commercials or websites applying their knowledge of child development theory and essential elements of school readiness.

Mrs. Oliva's 4th grade class at Lakeview Elementary enthusiastically shared how they are using Zearn Math to build procedural fluency and accuracy. Then, I met a young boy who had just moved into our country several weeks earlier as a non-English speaker. He was rapidly acquiring vocabulary and language skills using Imagine Learning on his chrome book. When I asked how he was enjoying school, a bright smile lit up his face!

This model of utilizing technology to provide personalized instruction and learning is happening right now in Weber School District. Four additional schools will come on board in January, with even more schools in the near future. The potential for technology to revolutionize teaching and learning is only limited by the boundaries we establish. I applaud innovative, courageous teachers who are willing to think creatively as they discover ways to enhance learning for students. It truly is an historic time!

Monday, 01 October 2018 12:52

October 2018 Superintendency Message

A message from Assistant Superintendent Lori Jo Rasmussen:

I love this time of year! We are fortunate to live in Utah with its four distinct seasons. Fall brings with it colorful landscapes, crisp weather, football, and of course the harvest season. I love all fall has to offer, but the harvest season is dear to my heart because it has given me valuable insights in my life.

My grandpa and grandma were master gardeners. They came by this naturally. With a lot of hard work and determination, they achieved great success! Friends, family, and neighbors all benefitted from my grandpa and grandma’s garden. It was a simple garden by today’s standards, just a plot of fertile ground with immaculate dirt rows, but the harvest was incredible. I would watch amazed at how a little seed could produce the amazing fruits and vegetables we would enjoy!

I came to understand that a whole garden isn’t created overnight, and neither is any lofty goal or change you want to achieve or make in your life. When a seed is cared for with sunlight and water it starts to grow and develop into the magnificent wonder it was meant to be. It is much the same with any new endeavor or journey. When one pays attention to their dreams and aspirations, to the “seeds” planted in their lives, a beautiful transformation can take place. Each seed is the start of something new, something bigger than one can imagine.

Parents and educators plant seeds of hope and beginnings each and every day in their children’s and student’s lives. They nurture and care for them daily. Many times, the true fruits of their labor and the beautiful transformation take some time. It can be years later, when a child has reached adulthood or when a student has graduated, that the transformation has truly taken place. What a wonderful harvest!

There is no better time than the present to work towards the life you dream of for yourself, your students, or your family! There is a quote that speaks to this; “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago, the second-best time is today.” Time to grab a shovel and get to work!

We thank our parents, educators, and families for the fine work, true dedication, and unwavering commitment to help our students grow!

Don’t judge each day by the harvest that you reap, but by the seeds that you plant!
~Robert Louis Stevenson

Monday, 01 October 2018 09:02

Technical Support Help Desk

Help Desk Topics

 

Aesop
  • You can access Aesop via phone at 1-800-942-3767 or from Frontline Support's Website 
  • Your default ID is your home phone number with Area Code
  • You can click have your ID or PIN e-mailed to you with the links below the login box on their Website
  • You can send a help desk ticket for more Aesop help.
   
Faculty and Staff Support
  • Faculty and Staff should contact their school or building tech for all techincal support by filling out a ticket at help.wsd.net.
  • If you are unable to log into a computer to create a help ticket, another computer may be used, or even a phone that is on the WiFi.
  • If your account is disabled, make sure you've signed the AUP.  Sign it again if you are unsure.
   
Parent Support
  • For help with the Portal, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • The "Pay Fees" link on MyWeber doesn't show up until 24 hours after you create your account
  • Missing fees in the "Pay Fees" portal need to go directly through the school
  • Questions regarding your student's login need to go through your student's school 
   
Password Retrieval
  • Employees who forget their passwords need to go to Employee Online and use the forgot password link
  • Employees who failed to re-set their passwords and have been locked out need to go to Employee Online and use the forgot password link
  • Ensure you've signed the AUP every year to keep your computer login.  It can be signed at any time to reactivate your account.  It can be signed from home or on a phone
  • Student passwords can be re-set at their school.  Have them contact their teacher for more instructions
   
Portal Support (MyWeber)
  • For help with the Portal, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Parent usernames are an e-mail address
   
Student Chromebook Support
  • Elementary students need to advise their teacher if they are having Chromebook problems
  • Secondary students need to take their Chromebook to the Librarian if they are having problems
  • There is no after-hours support for student Chromebooks
  • More information can be found on the one-to-one help site
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