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Tuesday, 26 February 2019 11:29

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Tuesday, 19 February 2019 01:24

Roy High School Develops ROAR Resource Center

The ROAR Resource Center at Roy High School is being developed to provide food, clothing and additional assistance for students in need and their families. This resource is available for use throughout the Roy Cone.
 
In December, our food pantry served 228 students and their families. We feel very grateful to provide this service, and we are thankful for all the donations of food and personal hygiene items we've received. Thank you to everyone who has helped us grow! We are expanding quickly, and we appreciate your support! 
 
We are currently gathering clothing to stock a new clothing center. We're just getting started, and we're excited. Along with a few bags of clothes and a couple of coats, we currently have some gently used shoes. We likewise have several blankets. Our goal is to greatly expand our clothing pantry.
 
If you have interest in helping us, we welcome your involvement. Our food pantry wish list currently includes healthy snack foods and dinners in a bag. We are also going to need more shelving, clothing racks and bins, and we are looking for a fridge, freezer, washer and dryer. If you have connections, would you please let us know? Similarly, whenever you're making charitable donations, coordinating service projects and/or cleaning out your closets, please consider contributing to Project ROAR. We welcome financial contributions, as well as donations of products and services to help our students. Donations are tax-deductible.
 
Please help us spread the word about the resources we have available in the ROAR Resource Center. If you are aware of students and families with food, clothing or other needs, please reach out to Jennifer Christensen, Project ROAR's grant facilitator and community liaison, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or (435) 799-7343. She will then coordinate with Camie Walworth, our new Family and Youth Advocate Specialist and with Charlie Lovatt, our new Resource Integration Coach.
Tuesday, 19 February 2019 10:33

Junior High Tours

Fremont High School had their feeder Junior High Schools come to Fremont and learn about CTE courses offered before the 9th graders register for high school.

Students view program booths

Students view program booths

Tuesday, 19 February 2019 10:13

Weber FFA Food for America

Weber FFA students at Lomond View Elementary. They were presenting Food for America. Discussing where food comes from and how it is processed.

Weber students meeting with elementary students.

Weber students preparing food.

Tuesday, 19 February 2019 00:10

"30 Days of Service" Roy High School

For the month of December the CTE office worked with the Roy High Clubs and classes to collect socks for the Lantern House in Ogden.  Socks are the #1 most requested clothing item at homeless shelters.  No one should go without warm, dry socks.  Everyone deserves Warm Feet!

Friday, 01 February 2019 14:00

February 2019 Superintendency Message

A message from Superintendent Jeff Stephens:

"For Good"

While visiting Bonneville High School this past December, I happened to walk by the choir room. The sound coming from Mishy Kirby's Tapestry class was simply too inviting to pass up. I listened to remarkable young people rehearsing several songs for their upcoming holiday performances. The students even let me select a number and they performed it for me. Following that song, I stood beside this extraordinary teacher who has impacted so many students through the years and asked the class, "Do you know how lucky you are to be able to have this incredible woman as your teacher?" Their response was one of heart-felt warmth and gratitude. Then I said, "I am going to ask you to get together as a class for just a minute and select one song that you would like to sing that expresses just how you feel about her."

They quickly gathered into what looked like a friendly rugby scrum and within a matter of moments quickly dispersed to retrieve the sheet music in the back of the room. The song they selected—"For Good" from the hit Broadway musical Wicked. What followed is a moment I will forever cherish as these students, who deeply loved and admired their teacher, sang from the bottom of their hearts:

I've heard it said that people come into our lives for a reason;

Bringing something we must learn…. who help us most to grow if we let them,

And we help them in return.

Well, I don't know if I believe that's true,

But I know I'm who I am today because I knew you!

It was a memorable experience I shall never forget! And, for me it represented everything that's good about the relationship between a teacher and students. Students develop a trust, a respect and an appreciation for what a caring teacher does for them. Lives are changed for the better because kids know you!

I recognize that every adult who works in Weber School District has that same potential impact "for good" on students. While we may not have the opportunity to have our students sing to us expressing how they feel, I know that their gratitude is every bit as real. I appreciate each one of you for changing lives "for the better."

Weber School District and neighboring school district officials have been made aware of a troubling social media challenge geared to engage and cyberbully children and young adults – the "Momo Challenge." The challenge has been reported on local and national news stations, as well. Reports of the "Momo Challenge" directly targeting and/or impacting students in Weber School District have not yet been substantiated, but as a precaution, we are informing all parents/guardians of this current and potentially dangerous social media trend.

The purpose of the "Momo Challenge" is to utilize video games and social media platforms such as Minecraft, WhatsApp and Facebook to encourage children and young adults to commit dangerous and potentially violent acts towards others or even themselves. "Momo" is a ghoulish-looking avatar that threatens and cyber-bullies young people in the United States and around the world. The "Momo Challenge" has been linked to acts of self-harm and suicide. The challenge draws children in with a chat feature wherein they are asked to perform small tasks, but then escalates to more violent acts, even self-inflicted harm. The communicator requests photographs of the young person engaging in these serious acts as proof of follow-through. Even more troubling, if young people refuse to perform the tasks or acts (challenges), "Momo" threatens to leak personal information on the internet, leaves disturbing and threatening messages, and sends violent images to the viewer.

We strongly encourage parents/guardians to talk with their children about this dangerous challenge and closely monitor their online screen time and activities. Also, please be reminded that you/your child may utilize the SafeUT Tip Line/Crisis Line App or website, which allows users to submit a tip and/or speak directly with a crisis counselor at the University of Utah Neurological Institute (UNI). All schools in Weber District have promoted this valuable resource, and we encourage each and every parent/guardian to download the SafeUT App to your Smartphone and other digital devices.

The greatest deterrents to these dangerous challenges which circulate online with the intent to prey on children is open communication between parent and child and vigilant monitoring of your child's use of social media, the websites they've visited, and video gaming.

If you'd like to speak with someone about how to communicate with your children about the "Momo Challenge" or other cyber-bullying concerns, please contact your school's guidance counselor or the Weber School District Student Services Department (801-476-7800).

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